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Assorted Interesting Links: Bell, Schmidt, Linderman, Madsen

From Wired, a November 2005 interview with Google's Eric Schmidt.
I've always said that if [Google] were founded today on an empty lot, we would build the buildings brick by brick. We can't imagine someone else building our buildings, we'd have to build it ourselves. This is a build-it-yourself culture. The good news is there's no free land, and so we have to rent the buildings, rather than build them. But the culture is around building things. In that sense, by the way, it's similar to some of the companies (Intel, Dell, Sony) that I mentioned earlier.
From the Washington Post: Its all about context. Joshua Bell in jeans and baseball hat playing "Chaconne" on a Stradivari in a DC metro station. Hundreds of morning commuters ignore him. Great article and video clips.
If a great musician plays great music but no one hears... was has really any good? It's an old epistemological debate, older, actually, than the koan about the tree in the forest. Plato weighed in on it, and philosophers for two millennia afterward: What is beauty? Is it a measurable fact (Gottfried Leibniz), or merely an opinion (David Hume), or is it a little of each, colored by the immediate state of mind of the observer (Immanuel Kant)?
From 37Signals's Matt Linderman: auto-pilots come at a cost. Great comment thread.
Every time you outsource something, put something on automatic, or get software to do it for you, you put up another layer. After a while, these layers add up. They blur your vision.
From OR-Live: They've won a Webby Award for online brain surgery.
The program featured neurosurgeons removing a brain tumor employing functional mapping of the cortex on a 13-year-old pediatric patient through the use of Children's intraoperative MRI system, known as the MR-OR, the first and only system of its kind at a pediatric hospital in the country.
Congrats to the neurosurgeon -- my brother-in-law, Joe Madsen. Joe, your work helping kids is incredible.
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