Greg Fox

Vice President, Nonprofit Vertical Strategy
Greg Fox

Greg Fox is Vice President, Nonprofit Vertical Strategy at Merkle. He joined the company in 2000 to establish a data-driven, strategic fundraising agency group. Fox is a 30 year veteran of direct response fundraising, with expertise in developing innovative fundraising marketing strategies and solutions. He has helped raise hundreds of millions of dollars for many of the largest and most respected fundraising brands in America and while he has broad-based fundraising experience, he is highly regarded as a leader in the national health-charity sector.  

Prior to joining Merkle, Fox was a founding partner in TheraCom, a leading provider of full-service specialty pharmacy solutions and marketing strategies that served the healthcare and charitable industries. He also served as Vice President of Direct Response Fundraising at the National Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, where he started his career and created the organization’s first national direct response program.

Fox is an industry thought leader, frequent speaker at industry conferences and an active participant in the DMA nonprofit federation. He graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia.

Greg's Articles, Blog Posts, Webinars and More

America’s Newest Tax Reform — Good or Bad for Charity?

America’s Newest Tax Reform — Good or Bad for Charity?

Three ... two ... one. Happy New “tax” Year! Or is it? That’s the $13 billion question facing the network of nonprofit organizations in the US. 

Becoming Great at People-Based Marketing

In an industry where 75 percent of revenue comes from individuals, it’s only logical that we should be putting people first in our marketing efforts. It’s time that fundraisers learn how to become great at people-based marketing.

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Mid-Year Charitable Giving Report: A Positive Response

Earlier this year, the Indiana School of Philanthropy predicted charitable giving would rise 3.6 percent in 2017. Based on the volume of individual contributions received during the first half of the year, it appears as if the industry is on pace to meet those projections.
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Attribution: Where Do You Stand?

The nonprofit industry is becoming more diversified and complex and as donor behaviors continue to evolve, it is imperative that direct-response fundraisers adopt new methods and/or solutions for quantifying the impact of their marketing investments.
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An Over-Saturated Charitable Experience

In a previous blog post, I briefly examined what appears to be a growing sentiment in the nonprofit industry that direct mail fundraising is somehow flawed.
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Are You Ready for People-Based Fundraising?

Three in every four dollars are donated by individuals, according to Giving USA 2015: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2014. Given this statistic, it’s imperative that, as fundraisers, we master the principles of people-based marketing.
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Fundraising Needs to Board the People Train

It wasn’t that long ago that “digital” came roaring into the nonprofit sector like a high-speed freight train barreling down the tracks without brakes—the steam whistle warning all those in its path to either jump aboard or get left behind.
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Put the ‘Integrate’ in Integrated Fundraising

As the use of digital marketing continues to evolve and expand within the nonprofit industry, fundraising executives are demanding more integration within their marketing, communication and fundraising solutions.
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Put More "Faith" in Your Brand - A Christian Tale

This is the tale of two of my favorite American charities. One founded by a Presbyterian minister, the other a Catholic Priest. One organization is non-sectarian, the other interdenominational. Both promote long-term sustainable solutions to break the cycle of poverty.
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No Words Necessary

I came across a picture the other night on Facebook that I promptly shared. It had no explanation, no tag, no link, no credit, no nothing. Just a 4-word phrase, “Worth a Thousand Words”. The phrase was true.